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Telling The Black History Stories of Jamaicans Around The World

Damian Williams - Jamaican making Black history
Damian Williams

[SOUTH FLORIDA] – Black history to many people means the recognition of popular African American leaders such as Martin Luther King Jr, Rosa Parks, and Harriet Tubman. These figures are celebrated for their remarkable contributions to the black community and commitment to ensuring civil rights for all.

The contributions of the Caribbean and African diaspora are often not acknowledged as Black history. Especially with many important figures remaining unknown. With the push to recognize Black history “year-round, not just 28 days” it is necessary to celebrate all the important freedom fighters. No matter where they are from.

Can you name any Jamaican contributors to black history?

Jamaicans.com offers an extensive collection of articles focused on enlightening its audience on Jamaican people. Especially those who have made history by fighting for civil rights worldwide.

Jamaicans.com founder, Xavier Murphy, began the website in 1995 to unite Jamaicans all over the world. Best of all through Jamaican news, recipes, and offer many opportunities for people to form a community. A pivotal part of this effort has been focusing on allowing Jamaicans to tell their own stories. Highlighting the efforts of Jamaican-born and Jamaican descent individuals alike. In its 26 years, Jamaicans.com has accumulated a substantial number of articles. Plus, stories that celebrate the historical importance of Jamaicans and celebrate Jamaica’s rich Black history.

Jamaicans Making History

Jamaicans.com covers the well-known Jamaican contributors to Black history such as Marcus Garvey, Bob Marley, and Louise Bennet. In addition, they also recognize those who excel in their fields, with few public accolades. Some of the stories available on the platform include Jamaican-born Jeanine McIntosh Menze. Jeanine is the first Black woman pilot in the United States Coast Guard since its beginnings in 1790.

Jamaican American Damian Williams, the first Black United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York. There is Jay-Anne Johnson, the first Jamaican Black female student to graduate from James Madison University a Bachelor’s degree in biophysical chemistry. Monique Mendes, the first black woman and only the second black person to receive a PhD in neuroscience at the University of Rochester in New York is a Jamaican.

Phelecia Nembhard a Jamaican is the first female, person of color and the youngest individual to be elected mayor of New Carrollton, Maryland. Jamaican-born Paul Smith is the first black person to reach the rank of Commander in the Royal Canadian Navy’s 106-year history.

Colin Powell, retired 4-star US Army General and 65th US Secretary of State. Powell is the first Black person to serve in that role. In addition, the only Black person to serve on the Joint Chiefs of Staff, among many others.

Historic Contributions of Jamaicans

Jamaicans.com actively works to expand the public’s knowledge about Jamaicans who, although making historic contributions to the world, have been overlooked by historians. Giving the public the opportunity to explore interesting, obscure histories. These include, among others, Dr. Harold Moody (1882 -1947), who established his own medical practice and was president of The League of Colored Peoples, a group whose main goal was to promote equality. John Brown Russwurm (1799–1851), the co-publisher of the first Black newspaper in the United States, the Freedom’s Journal, and one of the first Blacks to graduate from college in the US.  Mary Seacole (1805-1881), known as the “British Heroine” for her work helping wounded British soldiers in the Crimean War. Robert Sutherland (1830- 1878), who became the first Black lawyer in Canada. Arthur Wint (1920 –1992), winner of Jamaica’s first Olympic gold medal in the 1948 men’s 400-meter event.

Making History

By telling the stories of Jamaicans throughout history, Jamaicans.com is ensuring that future Jamaicans will continue to strive for change. Best of all, lead the way to a brighter future. Telling these stories also ensures that these heroes get the recognition they deserve.

 

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