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Reggae Poster Exhibition on Display at the OAS

WASHINGTON, DC  – The top twenty-four entries in the International Reggae Poster Contest are now on display in the Marcus Garvey Hall of Culture at the headquarters of the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington DC.

This fine display of artwork was opened to the public on Thursday, May 22, 2014.  The pieces on display were selected from among 1,100 entries representing 79 countries which participated in the second Reggae Poster competition.

The exhibition dubbed, “Jamaica Time” attracted a wide cross-section of the diplomatic corps, representatives from various Caribbean organizations, as well as members of the Jamaican and Caribbean community from across the Washington metro area.

In his welcome remarks, Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency Stephen Vasciannie said the poster exhibition focused merely on the images of the artists from the Americas and draws attention to the importance of posters as an art form.  It also brings home the social contribution that can be made by both posters and Reggae music.

“The embassy of Jamaica along with Jamaica’s permanent mission to the OAS is honored to show case the talent of so many, particularly from the Americas who did such excellent art work.  This exhibition will highlight the interest of the people of the region and the world in Jamaican culture, specifically the Jamaican music form of Reggae.

The Ambassador lauded Mr. Michael Thompson, founder of the International Reggae Poster contest for this significant step in conceptualizing such a contest.

In her remarks, University of the West Indies (UWI) Literary and Cultural Studies Professor, Carolyn Cooper said “This magnificent exhibition of posters at the OAS demonstrates the way in which visual artists from across the world have graphically represented their own localized vision of reggae music.”

She added that the posters created, are simultaneously global and local, brilliantly illustrating the theme of the Global Reggae book which she edited.

She explained that globalization signifies cultural specificity of reggae music in its indigenous context of first production, Jamaica.  Simultaneously, globalization acknowledges the global dispersal and adaptation of reggae music in other local contexts of consumption and transformation.

International Reggae Poster founder, Michael Thompson told the audience that the competition is designed to celebrate the global achievement of reggae and its positive impact on the world.  He further stated that the number of entries received for the 2013 competition far exceeded the expectation of the organizers.  He said that this shows that Reggae music has touched the hearts and minds of music lovers the world over.

“The powerful synergy of Reggae and art, present a positive vision to the world and serves as a platform to launch the Reggae Hall of Fame which is to be constructed in Jamaica”.  The exhibition which opened to the public on May 19 will run through May 31.

Jamaican actor Karl Bradshaw (right), has the rapt attention of Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency Stephen Vasciannie, University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor Carolyn Cooper and founder of the International Reggae Poster completion Michael Thompson as they admire one of the 24 posters on display at the International Reggae Poster Exhibition held at the Marcus Garvey Hall of Culture at the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington DC on Thursday, May 22, 2014.  (Photo by Derrick A. Scott)
Jamaican actor Karl Bradshaw (right), has the rapt attention of Jamaica’s Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency Stephen Vasciannie, University of the West Indies (UWI) Professor Carolyn Cooper and founder of the International Reggae Poster completion Michael Thompson as they admire one of the 24 posters on display at the International Reggae Poster Exhibition held at the Marcus Garvey Hall of Culture at the Organization of American States (OAS) in Washington DC on Thursday, May 22, 2014. (Photo by Derrick A. Scott)

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